Monthly Archives: February 2015

Werckmeister Harmonies

 

This monochrome, dream-like film by Hungarian director Bela Tar is pure poetry and has stuck in my mind since it first came out in 2001.

Based on László Krasznahorkai’s novel “The Melancholy of Resistance,”  Werckmeister Harmonies is about powerlessness and tyranny.

It is a unique film, beautifully shot with long long takes. A true masterpiece that leaves you wondering what you have just witnessed on the screen.

 

“Mysterious, poetic and allusive…” Lawrence Van Gelder, New York Times

 

Take a look at the trailer and opening scene below.

 

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Posted by Chris

Spectacular Norwegian Scenery – Ex Machina

 

Anyone who is a fan of Alex Garland will know they will be in for a visual treat. From breathtaking scenes of the Gulf of Thailand to the empty streets apocalyptic London, the backdrops to his films are always a vocal point and plays a lot to the narrative of his stories.

 

His directorial debut, Ex Machina, is no exception. Set in the wilds of Alaska but filmed in Norway’s Valldal vally, the film highlights the the countries dramatic landscape.

 

“We knew that if we found a spectacular landscape it would provide a lot of the power of the guy. If he owns this landscape, he must be spectacular too.” Alex Galand

 

No less spectacular is CEO Nathan’s Alaskan mountain retreat, shot on location at the award winning Juvet Landscape Hotel.

 

“With its reflective surfaces, glacial soundscapes, and Kubrickian geometric compositions, this is knowingly seductive sci-fi cinema, its slyly subversive allegiances hidden by the two-way mirror of the silver screen, its androids dreaming of much more than mere electric sheep.” Mark Kermode, Observer film critic.

 

Take a look at the trailer below.

 

 

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Russian Ark – A miraculous film

 

Russian Ark is an astonishing film directed by Alexander Sokurov in 2002.

There are several reasons why this is probably one of the most magnificent films in history but one that may fascinate cinematographers and editors is that this unusual documentary that takes us through 300 years of Russian history was shot in a single day AND …It is a single shot 99 minutes feature.

 

Sokurov and amazing cinematographer Tilman Büttner (Hanna) managed to get 2000 actors, 2 live orchestras and a total of 4500 people (including crew) working so perfectly to complete principal photography at the fourth take. Achieving such result is seriously a miracle.

 

The movie was shot on digibeta uncompressed and is the first ever feature film consisting of a single shot. If you have never seen Russian Ark I strongly recommend it, it may not be everyone’s cup of tea but it truly is a feast for the eyes. See trailer below.

 

Posted by: Luca

 

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